Tutankhamen: When the discovery of a tomb in Egypt changed the world

Tutankhamen: When the discovery of a tomb in Egypt changed the world
Tutankhamen: When the discovery of a tomb in Egypt changed the world

Tutankhamen: When the discovery of a tomb in Egypt changed the world

When Totan Khamenei’s tomb was found in November 1922, the world was captivated by him and he changed the world.

For today’s archaeologists, there is an extraordinary abundance of explanations about the identity of King Totan Khamenei, especially when many tombs were looted because of his mortuary belongings, and Premature deaths occurred.

When Toutan Khamenei’s treasure trove was exhibited outside Egypt at the Sachi Gallery in London, it became clear that it still had global appeal in the 21st century.

But King Tutankhamen’s power is as important in the context of the 1920s as it was in the contents of the tomb. British archaeologist Howard Carter, who discovered the tomb, also faced a political storm. Egypt has recently undergone a political upheaval and the new government has tightened its grip on antiquities. Signed a special agreement under which the Times newspaper had the right to provide news and pictures of the tomb to the press around the world.

Such arrangements were very unusual at the time. Kate Warsi, assistant archaeologist at the Griffith Institute in Oxford, believes that financial support and the continued interest of the media were crucial “because the excavation was so expensive that it took almost ten years to complete.” Lights, camera, action
Harry Burton, a British-born photographer at the New York Metropolitan Museum of Art, was brought in to photograph the excavation. His work style was complex and dramatic, he took pictures of objects in special light and from different angles and this technique was also introduced in Hollywood at that time.

This excavation revealed that the world is lost in the magic of ordinary and extraordinary treasures. Paul Collins of the Ashmolein Museum, Oxford, says “the best use of technology has been to enhance Egypt.”

This was the time when radio, telegram, newspapers and movies came together to get even the smallest information about Tutankhamen.

Burton’s photographs revealed that there were more than 5,000 items in Tutankhamun’s small tomb. In addition to gold statues and ornaments, decorated boxes and boats, everyday items such as bread and pieces of meat, pulses and dates were also included. There were even flower necklaces. These discoveries also influenced the fashion design of the 1920s and Egyptian designs of snakes, birds and flowers were designed on clothes. Burton Keeper Luxury Pictures talks about the new consumerism of the 1920s.

American economist Thorsten Webblin recently coined the term ‘significant consumption’, which summarizes the ‘expressive power’ of purchasing ‘twentieth-century consumer economy’, according to Weblein. Showed that they can afford shopping in addition to the basic necessities of life.

King Totan fulfilled people’s perceptions and product demands with the products of his world. Tutankhamun was perhaps easier to refer to than other empires of the past, as King Tutankhamun’s father, Akhenaten, introduced a new style of dictatorial art that presented the kingdom as a gentle and natural way, as well as family life. In this new style, women had a prominent role.

Statues of women in the four corners of Tutankhamen’s tomb, including the statue of the goddess Isis, were an inspiration to modern women, a new type of woman emerging after World War I. The ‘Modern Girl’ was a global trend, such as the Newfreun in Germany or the Modern Girl or Moga in Japan, the Moding Xiaoji in China and the Gercones in France. They all had the same style of standing up for freedom.

Cleopatra’s style of short hair and shift dress, cocktail drinking and dancing to the beat of a jazz band, Modern Girl signaled resistance. She could attract a man or live without a man. She was also a trade icon … She sold lipstick, face powder, perfumes and face creams. Many of these, such as the Nail Queen product manufactured by Kashmir Chemical Company in Chicago, were marketed in Egypt.

Jazz Cleopatra

Josephine Baker, an African-American dancer who adopted the style of ‘Jazz Cleopatra’, was an example of a modern girl. Baker used Madame CJ Walker, a prominent black businesswoman in the United States, to make beauty products for black women.

Baker used this new beauty culture to empower herself. She challenged racism by adopting modern fashion. Baker became famous for her jazz routines at the Foles Bergerie music hall in Paris. Since it was no longer necessary for dancers to dance in pairs (where the man headed) it was very revolutionary. “Once you’ve danced alone, you can do whatever you want,” said Martin Guerpin, a Parisian musicologist.

King Totan also influenced jazz music, including a 1923 tune, in which Totan was described as “a little swayed wise.” The recognition that the Totan boys were kings came a few years after the discovery of their tomb. Carter found Totten’s tomb in 1925, when he began to open a series of coffins and was given the first king’s gold mask.

The re-emerging mummies were ordered by the new film industry. According to Roger Luxert of Berkeley College, John Balderstein was the first journalist to see Totten Khamene’s face, who wrote the script for the 1932 horror film The Mummy.

Tottenham Khamenei’s obsession with the 1920s was a global project of imagination. It connected people to ancient places and to each other. It gave people the idea that their loved ones, whom they had lost, were in a different and better place. And discovering the lost worlds in history made me realize the need to dream of new worlds.

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